Frequently Asked Questions

Below is a list of questions or topics that timeshare owners often ask. We are reviewing and adding to this list all of the time. If you cannot find the answer that you are looking for, please feel free to telephone or email us. You will find our contact details by clicking here   

About EUROC

EUROC is the official, independent, non-profit timeshare association that continues to stand side-by-side with timeshare owners, owner committee representatives and resort management teams from timeshare clubs and resorts around Europe.

Together, they form an alliance of like-minded people who all have the same goal, duty and commitment towards preserving, protecting and enhancing the world of timeshare ownership.

The primary goal of EUROC is to provide a platform and strong network for European timeshare club and resort representatives to come together – with a unified voice for the timeshare ownership industry – to share ideas, best practice and explore solutions for current and potential future issues impacting timeshare owners and their clubs.

The organisation is proactive in its approach, seeking solutions and advocating for positive outcomes before they potentially have an impact on timeshare owners and their clubs.

Some of the areas EUROC focuses its attention include:

  • Promoting best practice across the timeshare ownership community.
  • Providing an ‘Owner Advice Hub’ and acting as a legitimate source of information and support for timeshare owners’.
  • Consulting and supporting government officials and consumer bodies on matters that impact timeshare ownership.
  • EUROC provides connections and a strong network for its members with like-minded timeshare clubs and industry professionals.
  • Protecting timeshare owners via its code of conduct.
  • Raise awareness of fraudulent practices affecting timeshare owners.

You can check if your club or resort is a member of EUROC by scrolling through our Member Directory on the website. This is located here.

Please note: If your club or resort is a EUROC member, you will receive enhanced support. 

Timeshare General Information

The original timeshare product is a long-term holiday ownership model where multiple owners purchase the rights to use a resort property, typically in weekly intervals.

The two main types of timeshare are:

  • Timeshare Weeks – The member gets to use the specific resort and property type (for example, a 2-bedroom cottage), at a specific time of year (for example, the last week in May), and for a period of time provided they pay their annual maintenance or management fees.
  • Timeshare Points – Members buy a set number of points each year that can be used to reserve their holidays in various units and resorts, in a variety of locations based on availability.

 

There may be other products available such as Fractional Ownership or Floating Weeks. However, this is all dependent on the individual timeshare providers product portfolio.

The most popular timeshare destinations in Europe include:

  • United Kingdom
  • Spain
  • Portugal
  • France
  • Italy

Having a timeshare allows owners many positive benefits. Owners can:

1. Use their timeshare week themselves.
2. Gift the week for use by friends and family.
3. Rent out their week for profit (this may not always be possible, depending on the rules of the club).
4. Swap the week via a property exchange provider such as RCI, 7Across, Interval International or UKRE.

Frequently, the timeshare model proves to be a cheaper option for holiday making versus renting/buying a week through some of the online booking platforms.

Other advantages include:

  • Access to high-demand and popular locations versus hoping for rental availability.  
  • Spacious self-catering units with full kitchens, separate bedrooms, and resort amenities.
  • Consistent quality accommodation that is kept to good standards.
  • Advanced planning – book 12+ months out compared to last-minute rentals.
  • Potential cost savings over decades of holidays.
  • Ideal for family generations who want consistency and can create annual traditions.
  • Timeshare offers reliability and comfort for owners who love returning to their home club/resort each year.

In recent times, alternative timeshare membership products are being offered by some timeshare providers. These are typically lower in cost to join and are for a shorter period – usually 3, 5, 7 and 10 years. Many short-term members choose to renew their membership at the end of their initial term.

Long-term timeshare products are still available, and still prove to be popular. However, with the short-term products now available, it offers owners alternative options for holidaying at the timeshare clubs and resorts.

In the first instance, EUROC suggests and strongly recommends that any owners or members who have questions or concerns relating to their timeshare, should always contact their timeshare provider.  

Owners that choose not to contact their timeshare provider to discuss their timeshare, and who instead choose to engage with a 3rd party, could find themselves falling victim to timeshare-related fraud and potentially parting with large sums of money, with no guarantee of a resolution.

Why do resorts rent out weeks?

A large proportion of timeshare resorts have a portion of unsold weeks. The term ‘unsold weeks’ means that the resort has apartment-week slots that do not have an owner committed to that space.

Some of these unsold weeks were either never sold in the first place (this might be low-season space), or the resort has taken them back from members who have been allowed to exit.

There are several reasons why timeshare owners might exit, including:

  • Old age and inability to travel
  • Long-term illness
  • Financial hardship
  • Death with no family inheritance

 

Use of unsold weeks helps to control annual member costs

Timeshare resorts can use unsold weeks as rented promotional weeks. This means the spare weeks can be used to allow non-members to stay and sample the timeshare resort experience, with the view of them potentially becoming members.

In addition to the potential advantage of gaining new members, renting out unsold weeks to the general public generates income and supports the overall operating costs of the resort. Through the practice of renting out unsold weeks, resorts are able to reduce the level of annual membership fee increases for existing owners.

Without the provision to rent out unsold weeks, membership fees would increase dramatically. In most cases, the annual membership fees are substantially lower than the cost of ad hoc renting.

Methods used to rent out weeks

Back in the 1980s, timeshare rentals were achieved using marketing methods such as newspaper advertising, window posters, and promotions among the friends and families of timeshare members. However, since the emergence of rental engines such as Booking.com and Airbnb, most timeshare resorts can now place their unsold weeks for rent on these online accommodation marketplaces.

Online booking engines, like Booking.com, Airbnb, Sykes Cottages, and Cottages.com (known as Online Travel Agents or OTAs), charge commissions of between 15–30% on all bookings. Therefore, for cost reasons, it is always in the best interest of your timeshare resort to encourage more direct consumer bookings. Taking a direct booking eliminates the need to pay OTA commissions and can result in a huge saving in resort marketing costs.

Some resorts offer rental services for members

In certain situations, personal commitments and diary clashes mean some timeshare owners are unable to use their specific timeshare week. With the intention of helping their members, some resorts offer a rental service. This allows members to contact their resort and request that their week be rented out. In some instances, this can result in the cost of the annual fees being recovered through rentals.

It is broadly accepted as good practice for resorts to manage all rentals and not allow members to organise their own rentals. When the resort manages rentals, they can ensure a consistent level of customer service for the incoming guest. Additionally, the resort can ensure effective communication and adherence to mandatory resort/guest terms and conditions that protect the resort and the guest. This means the incoming guest enjoys a smooth customer experience.

Timeshare Exit

Sometimes timeshare owners need to hand-back or sell their timeshare for a variety of different reasons. At this time, owners looking for an exit can be extremely vulnerable to fraudulent operators. Most timeshare providers already have an exit programme in place, so speaking with your club or resort should always be the first option.

Primarily and most importantly, always contact your timeshare provider
In the first instance, if you are thinking about exiting your timeshare, EUROC suggests and strongly recommends that you always contact your timeshare provider to discuss the options available to you. 

Contact your club or resort committee representatives
Most timeshare providers have an owner committee in place, who are there to represent and speak on behalf of its’ owners. Usually, the club committee is comprised of several timeshare owners who also own at your club. Therefore, it is recommended that should you have any questions about timeshare exit, that you make contact with one of your owner committee representatives to discuss the options available to you.

Contact the EUROC Timeshare Support Hub
The EUROC Timeshare Support Hub team are on hand to help with independent and confidential support and signposting.

The EUROC Timeshare Support Hub Contact Details:

Online Form (Click Here)

Email us (Click Here)

By phone (Click Here)

If you choose not to contact your timeshare provider to discuss your exit options and engage with a 3rd party, this could lead to you becoming a victim of timeshare-related fraud and parting with large sums of money, with no timeshare exit in place and owing outstanding maintenance fees.

Much of this depends on the policies and rules that are in place with your individual timeshare provider. In the first instance, you should contact them and ask what the options are for exiting your timeshare. At this point, you should review your timeshare contract and paperwork from when you first joined your club/resort, as being familiar with the specific details of your timeshare will help speed up the process.

If you choose not to contact your timeshare provider to discuss your timeshare exit options, and engage with a 3rd party, this could lead to you becoming a victim of timeshare-related fraud and parting with large sums of money, with no timeshare exit in place and owing outstanding maintenance fees.

Here are some tips to avoid issues when trying to exit and sell your timeshare through a third party:

  • If they made unsolicited contact with you by email, phone or text – this will likely be a case of data theft.
  • If they tell you not to speak to your timeshare provider at all and to deal only with them.
  • Stop all contact if you feel pressured and uncertain.
  • Don’t believe claims of having an instant buyer – Beware of resellers promising they have buyers ready to purchase. This is usually untrue and designed to get an upfront fee from you.
  • Watch out for fake look-alike websites or non-legitimate companies – Scammers create sites mimicking real timeshare resale sites, to appear legitimate. Double-check the website addresses to ensure this belongs to the real company. Be careful of the results produced by a Google search, and always do some research on the company before interacting with them.
  • Be careful of bank wire transfers to individuals – Wiring money directly to someone claiming to be a buyer is risky. Consult a solicitor if you have found a person who seems genuine and wants to buy your timeshare from you. Most scammers will quickly disappear when they realise you have a desire to use a legal professional. 
  • Avoid upfront fees – Be careful about paying large upfront fees to a reseller before the timeshare is sold. Only pay a commission once it closes.
  • Be careful of large transfer fees – Transferring a deed should never require large fees from the owner. 
  • Don’t hand over the deed or licence certificate prematurely – Never give the deed to the timeshare to a reseller before the sale closes and is fully complete.
  • Don’t fall for unrealistic prices – If a reseller claims they can get an amazing price for your timeshare, it’s likely too good to be true. 
  • Read contracts carefully before signing – Make sure contracts don’t have hidden fees or waive liability for the reseller.
  • Research the reseller thoroughly – Check internet reviews, complaints and longevity in business before agreeing to sell with them.
  • Trust your instincts – If an offer seems suspicious or too good to be true, walk away.

 

Doing proper vetting and carefully reading sales paperwork and contracts can help timeshare owners to avoid scams and successfully sell their timeshare. 

In the UK, companies that are regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) or who are listed with the Solicitors Regulatory Authority (SRA), are bound by strict operating rules and legislation.

If a company can give you either an FCA number or an SRA number, you can check this via the FCA and SRA registers.

  • Use SRA Register here 
  • Use FCA Register here
  • Check if a company is registered with the Information Commissioners Office (ICO) here

 

Additional information for timeshare owners who are based outside of the UK will be available in due course. In the meantime, if you are unsure of the credentials of any company that is seeking to help you exit your timeshare, please consult a qualified legal professional.

If you choose not to contact your timeshare provider to discuss your timeshare exit options, and engage with a 3rd party, this could lead you to falling victim to timeshare fraud and parting with large sums of money with no timeshare exit in place and owing outstanding maintenance fees.

Here are some important questions and checks that timeshare owners should make if dealing with a 3rd party company, offering to help them exit and sell their timeshare:

  • How long have you been in business selling timeshares? Look for several years of experience in the industry as a positive sign.
  • Are you a limited company and registered with UK Companies House or equivalent? What is your company number? If you cannot easily trace the company online, this should make you suspicious. 
  • Who is your Professional Indemnity Insurer? Ask the company to send you the policy details.
  • Ask what their success rate is in selling timeshares? Ask how many timeshares they sell each week/month/year.
  • Ask for references from previous clients, that you can contact to ask about their experience of using the company.
  • Ask if your timeshare is listed on public listing sites. Ask them to send you a link to where your week will be advertised. 
  • Ask about the fees, what the payment options are and when the fees are due. Avoid companies asking for large upfront fees and asking for direct bank transfers of payment.
  • Ask how often you will be provided with an update on the selling progress. They should provide frequent status updates and not go radio silent.
  • Ask them to explain the sale process step-by-step. Ask them to email this step-by-step process to you. Make sure that you understand the full process and timeline, so expectations are clear.
  • Ask for and carefully read their terms and conditions (T&Cs) of service. If anything does not make sense, be careful about progressing. 
  • Ask what happens if they are unable to sell your timeshare. Make sure the next steps are outlined if no buyers materialise.
  • Get all verbal commitments and communications from the company in writing. 

 

Doing thorough due diligence on the company, verifying credentials, understanding the process, fees, and asking the right questions can give timeshare owners confidence they are working with a reputable sales company. It is advised that you consult with a local to you legal professional, rather than one found through an internet search.

Additional information for timeshare owners who are based outside of the UK will be available in due course. In the meantime, if you are unsure of the credentials of any company that is seeking to help you exit your timeshare, please consult a qualified legal professional.

Timeshare in Spain – Spanish Supreme Court rulings explained:
 
Overview
Since 2015, the Spanish Supreme Court has made rulings relating to contracts signed under the Spanish timeshare law of 1998.
This law was repealed in 2012, when the second Spanish timeshare law was introduced, so the rulings
relate to sales made between January 1999 to 2012. In the majority of cases, the judges have ruled that the contracts are invalid and have to be re-wound.
Background
The law of 1998 regulated timeshare in Spain for the first time, and the law imposed an obligation for schemes to have an expiry date not exceeding 50 years. It also included a transitional provision providing for the regulation of timeshare sales at schemes which were in existence when the law came into effect. The law provided that they should have a duration of a maximum of 50 years, unless otherwise stated in the deed of adaptation. The preamble to the law also included a paragraph stating that the law is not intended to alter pre-existing schemes by simply making them and their method of operation a subject of public record. In addition to the ’50-year rule’ outlined above, the Supreme Court has also ruled on the sale of floating rights, where the object of the contract has to be accurately described, such as the building location, customer’s period of usage etc, and taking advance payments during the extended cooling off period.rights, where the object of the contract has to be accurately described, such as the
 
What action has the industry taken?
It is believed that the Supreme Court judges in Spain have misinterpreted the wording of the 1998 timeshare law and as a result, the industry has been working to persuade the Government to introduce an amendment of the law.

What should I do if I am approached by a firm that claims it can cancel my contract, and secure a refund and/or compensation?
Because of the limited applicability of the Supreme Court ruling and the likelihood that you might be charged for your use of your timeshare since you purchased it, if the case is unsuccessful, we would caution any owner approached by a self-styled claims company to consider their options very carefully before making any decision.
 
If you are looking to dispose of your timeshare, you should contact your resort or developer first and foremost. Many resorts, including all RDO members, have an exit programme in place and, depending on your personal situation, you may be able to hand back your timeshare free of charge, subject to the management fees being fully up to date.

Timeshare Resale and Release Advice

Sometimes timeshare owners need to hand-back or sell their timeshare weeks for a variety of different reasons. At this time, owners looking to resell or release, can be extremely vulnerable to fraudulent operators.

Before you engage with any 3rd party company, EUROC recommends that, if you would like to sell or release your timeshare, that you speak directly to your club/resort to discuss the options available to you, as your club may already have an in-house resale programme in place. 

If you choose to speak to or to sell or release your timeshare through a 3rd party company, please be very cautious if they:

  • Made unsolicited contact with you and initiated contact by email, phone or text – this will likely be a case of data theft.
  • State that your club/resort, an exchange company or a European listing of timeshare owners provided your telephone number and/or have asked them to reach out to you. This will not be the case.
  • Claim to already have a buyer for your timeshare.
  • Tell you not to speak to your club at all and to deal only with them.
  • Promise to pay an unusually high price for your timeshare.
  • Ask you to pay an upfront fee for legal, registration or administrative purposes in order to sell your timeshare. This is now illegal.
  • Pressure you into signing up for a holiday club or discount travel club in return for your timeshare.
  • Are a firm of solicitors asking for an upfront payment to help you obtain a refund of money you paid to a company which has failed to deliver the service it has promised.

If you choose not to contact your timeshare provider to discuss your timeshare resale/exit options and engage with a 3rd party, this could lead you to falling victim to timeshare fraud and parting with large sums of money with no timeshare exit in place and owing outstanding maintenance fees.

Here are some top tips for timeshare owners looking to resell their timeshare:

  • Speak to your club/resort – some clubs/resorts could try and sell your week for you through their in-house resales programme.
  • Use a reputable resale broker – they have experience marketing and selling timeshares. Vet brokers thoroughly first. Avoid large upfront fees.
  • Be flexible on selling price – be willing to negotiate or lower the price if there are no buyers initially at the listing price. It is very rare for second-hand timeshares to command large prices. You will get nothing close to what you paid for it.  
  • Act fast once interested – timeshares sell faster when capitalising on buyer interest right away. Be diligent but don’t delay once a serious offer comes in.
  • Hire a solicitor with escrow services – this protects both parties by holding funds until the deal officially transfers.
  • Understand all transfer fees – seek to cover or be prepared to part-fund any resort transfer fees so they don’t fall on the buyer. This can deter buyers.

In Europe, there are no regulated timeshare re-sales companies. They are not part of any consumer protection wrapper. Ask the ones you approach the questions set out in the exit section of the FAQ’s ‘Considerations if I am contacted about timeshare exit by a 3rd party company.’

In the UK, companies that are regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) or who are listed with the Solicitors Regulatory Authority (SRA) are bound by strict operating rules and legislation. 

If a company can give you either an FCA number or an SRA number, you can check this via the FCA and SRA registers. 

  • Use SRA Register here   
  • Use FCA Register here
  • Check if a company is registered with the Information Commissioners Office (ICO) here 

 

Additional information for timeshare owners who are based outside of the UK will be available in due course. In the meantime, if you are unsure of the credentials of any company that is seeking to help you exit your timeshare, please consult a qualified legal professional.

If you choose not to contact your timeshare provider to discuss your timeshare exit options, and you engage with a 3rd party, this could lead you to falling victim to timeshare fraud and parting with large sums of money with no timeshare exit in place and owing outstanding maintenance fees.

Timeshare Related Fraud

Here are some steps to take if you believe you have become a victim of timeshare related fraud:

  • Review the contract and documentation – look for any clauses about refunds, termination policies, cooling off periods or a money-back guarantee that may apply. This can support getting money back.
  • File complaints with consumer protection agencies – organisations like Action Fraud in the UK can log complaints that may trigger investigations.
  • Consult with a solicitor – a legal professional can review the case and contracts to determine if legal action can be taken to recover lost money.
  • Report to the police – file a report about the fraud with your local law enforcement.
  • Dispute credit card charges – if you paid with a credit card, you may be able to dispute the charges as fraudulent.
  • Contact your bank – notify your bank immediately if the fraud involved your bank accounts, credit or debit cards. They can freeze accounts and trace transactions.
  • Contact your timeshare provider – explain the situation as they may be able to offer advice and guidance.
  • Contact your timeshare provider – explain the situation as they may be able to offer advice and guidance.
  • EUROC Timeshare Support Hub – the EUROC Timeshare Support Hub offers help and guidance to timeshare owners in Europe and can be found here.


Consumer Advisories – where can I go for advice and reporting a company?
Here are some recommendations on how to report fraud if you’ve been a victim in the UK:

  • Contact Action Fraud – this is the national reporting centre for fraud and cybercrime in the UK. You can report incidents online or by phone. The Action Fraud website is here and the phone number is 0300 123 2040.
  • Report to your bank – notify your bank immediately if the fraud involved your bank accounts, credit or debit cards. They can freeze accounts and trace transactions.
  • File a report with local police – visit your nearest police station to file an official police report about the fraud. Get a copy of the report. 
  • Report to relevant regulators – if it was an online purchase fraud, report it to National Trading Standards. If investment fraud, report it to the FCA.
  • Report the email/website – if you were scammed via email or a fake website, report the email address or website domain to get it shut down.
  • Seek victim support – Organisations like Victim Support and Citizens Advice can offer resources and advice for fraud victims. Save all evidence of the fraud when filing reports. Acting quickly can increase the chances of recovering losses and preventing further damage.

 

Contacting your bank or financial provider
Here are the fraud helplines for all banks in the UK:

Bank

Fraud Helpline

AIB Group (UK) plc

0800 915 1101

Allied Irish Banks, p.l.c.

0800 915 1101

Bank of Ireland UK plc

0800 085 2655

Barclays Bank UK plc

0800 096 7491

Clydesdale Bank plc

0800 011 7771

Danske Bank A/S

0800 316 0899

First Direct

0800 915 4801

Halifax plc

0800 072 3186

HSBC Bank plc

0800 030 0121

Lloyds Bank plc

0800 915 6101

Metro Bank plc

0800 083 1688

Monzo Bank Ltd

0800 802 1221

NatWest

0800 011 6000

Nationwide Building Society

0800 907 2000

Northern Bank Limited

0800 011 7771

Royal Bank of Scotland plc

0800 922 1000

Santander UK plc

0800 9 123 123

TSB Bank plc

0800 912 8000

Ulster Bank Limited

0800 011 7771

Virgin Money plc

0800 912 9353

Additional information for timeshare owners who are based outside of the UK will be available in due course. In the meantime, if you are unsure of the credentials of any company that is seeking to help you exit your timeshare, please consult a qualified legal professional.

Cold calling and unsolicited contact

Here is a short consumer guide for reducing unsolicited cold calls and contact in the UK:

  • Ask the caller to stop – simply ask the company calling you to stop making calls to you, and tell them that if they don’t, you will report them to the authorities. 
  • Register with the Telephone Preference Service (TPS) or equivalent depending on your country of residence – add your number to the TPS register to opt out of receiving sales/marketing calls. It’s free.
  • Sign up for the Mailing Preference Service (MPS) or equivalent depending on your country of residence – the MPS removes your name from lists used for junk mail. In the UK, you can register online here. 
  • Use call-blocking tools – contact your phone provider about call-blocking services or download apps that can block nuisance callers. Use the blocking option on your telephone. On a mobile phone, numbers can be blocked also, depending on the type of phone you have. Search ‘Block caller’ for how to do this.
  • Don’t answer calls from unknown numbers – let unknown numbers go to voicemail. If it’s important, the caller will leave a message.
  • Hang up on suspicious calls – don’t engage with questionable callers. End the call if you suspect a cold call. 
  • Remove your phone number from directories – contact directory sites to opt out of your number being listed publicly. 
  • Never consent on cold calls – be aware that scammers record “yes” responses for consent. Avoid engaging.
  • Report cold callers – inform the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) about persistent unsolicited calls/texts for potential TCP investigation.
  • Scroll to the very end of unwanted emails to look for the unsubscribe button.

 

Saying “no” clearly and utilising opt-out services can help reduce intrusive cold contact. Be vigilant about protecting your contact information.

Here are links to the services referenced in the previous response on reducing unsolicited calls and contact in the UK:

Telephone Preference Service (TPS) https://www.tpsonline.org.uk

Mailing Preference Service (MPS): https://www.mpsonline.org.uk

192.com (edit personal info): https://www.192.com/optout/

Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO): https://ico.org.uk

These services allow consumers to opt out of marketing calls, junk mail, number listings, and charity fundraising contacts. Registering with them is free and straightforward for UK residents and helps minimise nuisance cold contacting.

As in many industries, some companies see what they feel is a market opportunity (a chance to make money), and they choose radio as a means of marketing. It is similar to companies that choose to pay for adverts with Google. Just because an advert is on the radio, does not mean that it is legitimate, so please ensure you check on the company before you engage with them. It is similar to companies that choose to pay for adverts with Google. 

Here are some methods you can use to report companies who have contacted you illegally via cold calls, emails, or texts without your consent in the UK:

  • Report to the ICO – the Information Commissioner’s Office investigates unauthorised electronic marketing. File a report on their website.
  • Report to the TPS – if you receive unsolicited sales calls, report the numbers to the Telephone Preference Service which can issue fines.
  • Forward spam texts – forward spam text messages to 7726 for free. This reports them to your mobile provider.
  • Use the company’s opt-out process – look for opt-out/unsubscribe links in emails or respond “STOP” to text messages.
  • Call the company directly – contact their customer service to inform them to cease contact and remove you from their lists.
  • Complain to the Direct Marketing Association – file a complaint with the DMA if the company violates their code of conduct. Please note that not every company is a member of this. 
  • Report to Action Fraud – if you suspect a scam contact, report it to Action Fraud – the UK’s fraud reporting centre. 

 

Documenting the unwanted contacts and reporting through official channels creates a paper trail in case further legal action needs to be taken. The key is to actively opt out.

EUROC also collates information about unsolicited contact, and the companies involved, and submits this information to the relevant authorities. To submit this information to us, please click here.

Timeshare Exchange

Owners can deposit their owned weeks or points into a global exchange inventory pool. In return, they can browse available resorts worldwide and book an equivalent reservation using their deposit.

Exchanges introduce flexibility but some deposits have higher “trading power” based on factors like resort popularity and season. Exchange companies also sell discounted rental weeks from excess inventory to members as added income options. 

Most timeshare owners utilise exchange programs operated by companies like:

Complaints about your timeshare provider

For timeshares owned at an independently operated club

If your club/resort is independently operated, with no management company or developer in place, then owners should always try and rectify any issues directly with their timeshare provider in the first instance. However, if you feel you need to raise a concern or seek further advice, then it is advised you contact EUROC by email: support@euroc.org

For timeshares owned at a club operated by a developer or management company (non-independent)

If you own your timeshare at a club that is operated by a developer, it is likely they will be a member of the Resort Development Organisation (RDO) – the trade association for timeshare ownership across Europe. They may also be a member of EUROC. See members here

RDO members (the developers) are bound by a code of conduct and an independent arbitration scheme, providing levels of protection beyond those required by law. Should you have a complaint or a concern about your developer, in the first instance it is recommended that you follow the advice listed above in ‘General Advice’. However, if you wish to make a formal complaint, you can also download the complaint registration form listed here on the RDO website. 

EUROC collects data on fraudulent activity and passes it to the relevant authorities. You can also report fraud to us here

If you cannot find an answer here?

Our Support Hub provides the option for you to telephone or email us, so please click the button below to go back to the Support Hub home page.